Notable Citizens: Edward L. Doyle

Circa 1915 photo of Frank J. Hayes, miner and President of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA); Edward L. Doyle who was Secretary Treasurer of District 15 of the UMWA and James Revell Lord, miner and union official. From the Library of Congress.

Edward Lawrence Doyle (1886-1954), Lafayette resident from 1908 to 1912 and United Mine Workers of America Dist. 15 Secretary Treasurer based in Denver from 1912 to 1917, is better known for his involvement in the fateful 1914 Ludlow Massacre, where he played a key role in communicating to national media the union’s perspective of the killings.

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A.C. Goodhue Building, also known as the Bermont Building, suffered severe damage due to subsidence

The A.C. Goodhue Building stood at E. Simpson and Iowa in Lafayette, Colo. and housed the Bermont & Van De Bergh general store. George Bermont owned the building from about 1903 until 1935. It was torn down about 1999.

Newspaper reports of turn-of-the-century subsidence events are sparse, but the lawsuit surrounding subsidence at the Abner C. Goodhue building (also known as the Bermont building) was well reported.

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The Overland and Denver-to-Cheyenne stagecoach lines utilized major pre-Lafayette transportation corridors

From 1862 until 1870, settlers dotting the prairie north of Denver and along Colorado’s Front Range were treated to a technological marvel known as the stagecoach. At the time, witnessing a bright red Abbot Downing Concord Coach gliding over the open grasslands with a driver at the reins, a messenger by his side guarding the strong box, and up to 12 passengers being pulled by six powerful horses was akin to witnessing the Orient Express chug its way out of the Constantinople train station.

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Lafayette’s connection to the “Champion of Silver” and the 1891 Silver Brick Case

Interests vying for low-priced public lands in the 1860s, including land that would eventually become Lafayette, could be classified into three categories: Settlers seeking opportunity, railroad companies seeking right-of-way, and speculators desiring to exploit minerals.

Area settlers and experienced farmers such as Adolf Waneka, Hiram Prince, James B. Foote and Mary and Lafayette Miller comprised the first category. The second category was dominated by the Union Pacific railroad company which, between 1864 and 1902, patented over 6,000 acres of public land in and near Louisville and Lafayette.
The third category, those interested in the minerals laying below the surface, included coal speculators Francis P. Heatley and Edward Chase, who ran a billiard hall on Blake Street in Denver. Heatley and Chase owned the land where Old Town Lafayette sits, which they sold to town founder Mary Miller and her husband, Lafayette, in 1868.

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Why Louisville, Colorado is pronounced “Lewisville”

Louis Nawatny’s 1863 Civil War draft record from Davenport, Iowa showing his place of birth as “Germany.” He’s listed as being 30 years old.

Is Louisville, Colorado pronounced “Lewisville” or “Louie-ville?” A clue to properly pronouncing Lafayette’s neighboring town can be found in Boulder County property records.

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